Lori Nishiura Mackenzie

Building Trust & Navigating the Workplace After #MeToo | 2019 Workplace Summit Session

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The #MeToo movement has led us to a watershed moment. Cultural norms and workplace policies are evolving. And new questions and realities are starting to surface. A recent study by LeanIn.Org and SurveyMonkey showed that twice as many male managers now feel uncomfortable working alone with, socializing with, and mentoring women. This is a pivotal moment for gender partnership. Come hear this forward-looking conversation about how to dispel fear, build trust, and develop workplace cultures that work for everyone.

Thought Leader:
Rachel Thomas, president, Lean In Foundation @leaninorg
Panelists:
Amy E. Gallo, author, HBR Guide to Dealing with Conflict @amyegallo
W. Brad Johnson, Ph.D, clinical psychologist, professor of psychology in the Department of Leadership, Ethics, and Law, United States Naval Academy, faculty associate, Johns Hopkins University and co-author, Athena Rising
Lori Nishiura Mackenzie, executive director, Clayman Institute for Gender Research, Stanford University @lorinmackenzie
Emcee:
Ashraf Hebela, head, analytics & sales operations, Silicon Valley Bank @svb_financial

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The New Law Requiring More Women on Corporate Boards: Thumb Up or Thumb Down?

Lori MackenzieSince Senate Bill 826 recently became law, a lot has been said about the new mandate that companies headquartered in California must include one to three women on their board of directors, depending on their board size: It’s good for women. It’ll ultimately hurt women. It’ll never withstand legal challenge. It doesn’t go far enough. We asked Lori Nishiura Mackenzie, executive director of the Clayman Institute of Gender Research at Stanford University and co-founder of the Stanford VMware Women’s Leadership Lab, for her take on the controversial law.

Thumbs up or thumbs down? Read More

2018 Session | The Language of Leadership

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Words can carry enormous weight, influencing our perceptions of people and even their leadership potential. Research shows that the words chosen to describe women leaders may vary from the way male peers are described for the same level of performance. Examining the bias embedded in our words, this session will change the way you describe yourself and others. Led by Lori Nishiura Mackenzie, this panel of experts will provide strategies to choose your words wisely when advocating for organizational talent and communicating your strengths as a leader. Read More

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2018 Session | Leading by Inclusion

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To lead with a focus on inclusion will impact our work in the conference room, in the boardroom, and beyond. Inclusive leadership affects who we hire and mentor, how we speak and listen, and what goals we set, review, and reward. Join this group of high profile professionals for some refreshing insights on inclusive leadership. Together we will discuss what works, what doesn’t, and what to watch out for as we broaden our leadership behaviors to create inclusive workplaces where all employees can thrive. Read More

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Could Your Emails Be Hurting the Friends You’re Trying to Help?

Lori MackenzieTechnology hasn’t only made it easier to stay in touch with former colleagues, old classmates and far-flung friends. It has also made asking them for favors such as referrals and introductions as effortless as hitting send.

Likewise, when you’re on the receiving end of such a request, it’s less or little hassle, in this age of email, to help a contact out.

But before you make another ask or agree to act as connector, consider this: some e-introductions can actually be harmful to women. Read More

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