March 2020 Newsletter

Tips for Managing Stress

Alice Boyes, Conference for Women speaker and author of The Healthy Mind Toolkit

How do we, as a community of working women, best deal with the growing stress that has suddenly been unleashed in our lives as a result of the coronavirus? To answer that question, we spoke with Alice Boyes, Conference for Women speaker and author of The Healthy Mind Toolkit. Here are her suggestions—followed by links to 3 sessions we hope you find helpful now:

  • “You generally want to control everything you can and accept everything you can’t.” For example, washing your hands is in your control. School closures are not. “People who do well in these scenarios,” she explained, “are people who can be flexible. They can problem-solve but also be accepting where being accepting is the only option.”
  • Make a short list of high-impact actions you can take to reduce your risk. Remember that too many ideas can lead to overwhelm. Then focus on emotional coping—things that help you keep calm and carry on. One of her favorites, for example, is restorative yoga.
  • Refrain from personalizing the impact of this crisis. “Whatever dilemmas you’re having, you’re not the only one.” We’re in this together and, in fact, it helps to remember your community and how we can help each other.
  • Be creative. If you were planning a spring break trip that you have to reschedule for the fall, consider your alternatives. For example, Boyes has been pitching a tent in the backyard with her four-year-old.
  • Finally, she suggested, remember that this is not our first rodeo. Crises are part of the human experience. And humans are remarkable about responding to them. In the end, they tend to bring out the best in us.

Do you have helpful thoughts to share with the Conference for Women community? Please send them to story@conferenceforwomen.org, and we’ll pass along highlights in our next newsletter.

THREE TALKS FOR THESE TIMES. With many of us now working from home, children out of school, fluctuations in the stock market, and all the other uncertainty we’re facing, we sorely need our community and wise words from women who know what it takes to be brave, resilient and even happy in difficult times. Here are links to 3 sessions we hope lift your spirits:

RESTORATIVE YOGA. Also, don’t miss these relaxing and restorative yoga moves to help you to slow down and get back to YOU!


More from the March 2020 Newsletter

Megan Rapinoe’s Tips on Building a Winning Team

Megan Rapinoe at the 2020 Watermark Conference for Women

There are so many topics that would be fun to talk with soccer superstar and women’s advocate Megan Rapinoe about. But leave it to pioneering journalist Pat Mitchell to zero in on one so relevant to so many of us.

At the 2020 Watermark Conference for Women Mitchell (the first woman president and CEO at PBS, former president of CNN, co-founder and curator of TED Women) asked: What lessons did you learn on the field that would apply to building any great team?

Here is what the co-captain of the outstanding U.S. Women Soccer team, FIFA player of the year, and Sports Illustrated Sportsperson of the Year had to say: Read More

Indra Nooyi Has a 3-Point Plan to Advance Women in Leadership

Indra Nooyi at the 2020 Watermark Conference for Women

Imagine what at least one section of Indra Nooyi’s bucket list might look like:

  1. Immigrate to America.
  2. Become CEO of a Fortune 500 company (say, PepsiCo, for example.)
  3. Transform it into one of the world’s most successful food and beverage companies.
  4. Step down after being one of the longest-serving female CEOs. (A dozen years is good.)
  5. Boost the number of women in leadership positions nationwide.

Status report: Done, done, done, done—and just you wait. Read More

Feel Like an Imposter? That’s a Good Sign

Seth Godin at the 2020 Watermark Conference for Women

There are many ideas about how to overcome imposter syndrome, that very common experience of doubting yourself despite how capable or successful you may be. But at the 2020 Watermark Conference for Women, marketing guru Seth Godin offered another way of looking at it.

“Of course, you feel like an imposter because you are one, and so am I,” he said. “How could it be otherwise? If you are going to lead, if you are going to project the future, if you are going to do something that has never been done before, how could you be sure [it will succeed]?” Read More

Not Every Success Story Begins That Way: Take it from theSkimm

TheSkimm Co-founders at the 2020 Watermark Conference for Women

When Danielle Weisberg and Carly Zakin flew into SFO last month to speak at the Watermark Conference for Women, they said they found it traumatic—because, as Carly put it, “we got really beat up here.”

She was referring to when they were young women who had quit their jobs as NBC news producers to build a media organization that could not only reach busy women but help them live smarter.

But their early efforts to fundraise resulted in a string of rejections. Recalls Carly: “They told us, ‘You don’t have a tech co-founder.’ ‘This is content; people don’t want content.’ And, ‘women are a niche market.’” Read More

Meet Silicon Valley Bank’s Jennifer Friel Goldstein

Jennifer Friel GoldsteinIn this piece, Jennifer, who is Head of Business Development, Technology and Healthcare for Silicon Valley Bank, shares the story of her unconventional career trajectory—and some of the lessons she learned along the way about iterating your career and investing in authentic relationships.

You never know what may lead to a career defining moment. In my case, it came after a succession of cold shoulders. Literally. As an undergrad, I spent hours in the lab as a bench scientist studying rotator cuff disease. For each session, I would have to thaw, and then refreeze, a human shoulder. As passionate as I was, and still am, about research, hanging out with frozen cadaver parts wasn’t an ideal environment for an extrovert like myself. Read More

The Expert Q&A on Engaging Male Allies

Tom SalgeWith Varian’s Tom Salge, Senior Director, Oncology Software Business Operations and Innovations

Q: Many men say they support equality for women in the workplace. But being an “ally” involves taking action. What are some examples of the most important kinds of actions male allies can take to advance gender equality in the workplace?

Just saying “I support women” is not enough. And, assuming you are not part of the problem is a cop-out and makes you part of the problem whether you know it or not. This is the nature of being born into male privilege: We don’t experience what women experience so we have to bend our minds to see it.

Here are a few tangible actions we can take as men to promote gender equality. Read More

5 Ways to Create the Career You Truly Want

Erica Williams Simon

At 27, Erica Williams Simon came to an important recognition. She was “successful” but not happy.

“So, I did what we are never supposed to do—especially as women, especially as black women: We’re never supposed to quit. You don’t quit. Well yes, you do and I did,” she recently said.

What she discovered in the time of self-exploration that followed was that many cultural and generational narratives had shaped her idea of what it means to be successful that had nothing to do with what she actually wanted out of life.

Now, the woman who had been listed on several “30 under 30” lists as a rising political star and TV commentator, is on a mission to help others understand the cultural stories that shape their lives and create new ones that will lead them to the life they actually want.

The author of the 2019 book, You Deserve the Truth, Erica shared these five insights with the Conference for Women: Read More

The Fix: Overcoming the Invisible Barriers to Creating Cultures of Equality at Work

Michelle P. King
 
For years, we have heard that to succeed at work, we have to change—lean in, negotiate like a man, hold back on being nice. But Michelle King, Director of Inclusion for Netflix and author of the new book, The Fix, says we don’t need to fix women, we need to fix work—for the sake of women, men and the future of innovation.
 

Scroll down and click Play to listen in your browser. Or subscribe to Women Amplified wherever you get your podcasts, and take advantage of Conference for Women speakers year-round!

Read More

Play

Want to Advance in Your Career? Try These 5 Ways to Make Yourself Known

Gabrielle Simpson Gambrell

If people were promoted just for being great at their job, there would undoubtedly be more women in leadership roles. But while leaders need to continue to work to make workplaces more equitable, there are also things women can do to help advance their own careers—and one of the most important may be making yourself known.

At least, it certainly worked for Gabrielle Simpson Gambrell, who advanced from a production assistant role to the first black woman to become Vice President and Head of Marketing & Communications at Barnard College by the age of 27.

She recently shared five of her strategies with the Conference for Women community. Read More

What you need to succeed in work and life now.

Smart, timely insights from inspiring women.
Delivered twice monthly to more than 150,000 subscribers.